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Aphasia and Brain Injury

BRAIN STIMULATION AND APHASIA

Here is a link to our partner who sells brain stimulation equipment. http://caputron.com?aff=6 This new aphasia research is personalization at its best. Rather than treat every brain the same, researchers are designing brain stimulation programs for individuals by...

THE CASE AGAINST USING APHASIA APPS

What is an aphasia app? An Aphasia App is an application downloaded by a user to a mobile device with the goal of improving a skill like naming objects. Aphasia apps usually provide one methodology for improving each skill. They generally cost between $10.00 and...

THE SECRET TO OUR SUCCESS

Click the heading to see a video of the secret to our success and then click to start the video.  

TYPES OF APHASIA TREATMENT

There are many methods to treat aphasia.  Below find quick summaries of some of the most common methods being used.  For more information, just Google the bold terms. Community Support and Integration Aphasia Groups—treatment and support for people with aphasia that...

WORD RETRIEVAL 2

One of the most common results of brain injury to the left side of the brain is word retrieval problems most often referred to as anomia or dysnomia. The most common complaint is they know what they want to say but can’t come up with the right word. This is often seen...

WORD RETRIEVAL 1

One of the most common complaints of our members is that when naming, they know what they want to say but can't say it or incorrectly name it. We have many programs that address that issue but one of the best is Visual Confrontation Naming which is in the Word Recall...

Definitions

Strokes happen when blood flow to your brain stops. Within minutes, brain cells begin to die. There are two kinds of stroke. The more common kind, called ischemic stroke, is caused by a blood clot that blocks or plugs a blood vessel in the brain. The other kind,...

How to Talk to Someone with Aphasia

Keep the environment noise-free minimizing as much background noise as possible. Limit the number of people in the conversation. Stand in the person's line of sight. Use facial expressions and gestures. Give the person time to speak and avoid talking for the person...